Still Life & Random Objects #2

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Majority of the photos I’ve collected are those of scenes and landscapes but, from time to time, while looking at a scenery, certain objects or structures stand out and catch my attention and eventually get captured into a photo.  These series of posts contain photos of these random objects, mostly taken in their normal/regular setting — not arranged or contrived as usually practiced in still life photography to attain the desired effect. Photos taken in Mongolia and Georgia are featured in this post.

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Old wooden carts emphasize the rustic theme of a hotel landscape

Wooden Carts” / Mongolia 2009 [Hotel Mongolia, Gachurt] : I found this row of authentic wooden carts on the grounds of a hotel complex, just outside of Ulaanbaatar, featuring gers (traditional tents) in lieu of regular rooms.  Since its breakaway from Soviet control in early 1990; modern vehicles started to flood the streets of Mongolia’s urban centers.  Even nomadic herders who traditionally used these wooden carts now use SUVs and 4×4 vehicles and this simple machine is gradually loosing its socio-economic relevance.  I particularly like the earth color and texture of the wood in these carts which to me exudes a combination of simplicity and strength of character.

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Drinking fountain at the entrance to Tsinandali Gardens

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“Flow of Life” / Georgia 2010 [ Tsinandali, Kakheti Region] : The Tsinandali Gardens in Kakheti Region was established in the 14th Century as the residence  of a Georgian aristocrat who pioneered wine-making in the Caucasus region and made famous the Tsinandali Wine.  Although the place is now converted into a museum, several of these preserved and functional drinking fountains can be found on the grounds of the garden, the cold and fresh water continuously flowing as if symbolizing the endless legacy of the place.

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Bush Street in Tbilisi

 “Presidential Lane” / Georgia 2011 [Tbilisi] : This street, which connects the capital city of Tbilisi to its international airport, was named after George W. Bush after the U.S. President  visited the country some years ago.  A Georgian friend hated this sign and I found it uncharacteristic of Tbilisi whose major streets are traditionally and aptly named after Georgian kings and heroes.  If I were the Georgian president, I would have christened it the “US-Georgia Friendship Avenue” to make the name more symbolic and, well, politically safe.  But I’m in a position only to comment, not to decide on such things…

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