Still Life & Random Objects #5

Majority of the photos I’ve collected are those of scenes and landscapes but, from time to time, while looking at a scenery, certain objects or structures stand out and catch my attention and eventually get captured into a photo.  These series of posts contain photos of these random objects, mostly taken in their normal/regular setting — not arranged or contrived as usually practiced in still life photography to attain the desired effect. Photos taken in the Philippines and Georgia are featured in this post.

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Polished jackfruit tree trunks being sold as chopping boards

 “Chopping Boards” / Philippines 2011 [ Santa Cruz, Davao del Sur] : “Jackwood” or timber from jackfruit trees are popular in Asia for construction, furniture and wood carvings.  In this photo, cut portions of the jackfruit trunk are dried and polished and sold as chopping boards in Davao del Sur, Philippines.  The  various shapes, tone and texture of the polished wood provided an interesting subject for this photo.

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Foggy car window

Batumi” / Georgia 2011 [ Batumi, Adjara Autonomous Region] :  We arrived in Batumi very early in the morning and I was very excited to immediately take photos of the place as we traveled to our hotel from the train station.  But it was still cold and the window of the taxicab we took was foggy, making it impossible to take photos.  In my frustration, I scribbled the name of the place and snapped this photo.  Nevertheless, we were able to take  a bunch of wonderful photos of Batumi later in the day.

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T'nalak and T'boli handicrafts on display

“T’nalak Loom” / Philippines 2010 [ Lake Sebu, South Cotabato] :  I really wanted to take a photo of the t’nalak being woven in a traditional T’boli way on my recent visit to Lake Sebu.  But because of limited time, we were able to visit only the souvenir shops where I found this set-up of  elegantly-colored t’nalak on display along with other T’boli handicrafts inside a bamboo hut.  The arrangement and lighting looked like that of  a “t’nalak shrine” to me and most probably very different from the traditional T’boli weaving environment but I liked how the photo came out anyway.

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