Food Traders of Kiunga Market

Aside from photographing foodstuff at Kiunga market (see Bush Food in Kiunga) in the Western Province of Papua New Guinea, my attention was also drawn by the vendors and traders selling stuff in the market as I know that they come from various villages and tribes all over the region and I can just imagine the many obscure ways by which they had to gather the items they’re selling and the difficulty they had to go through to bring these goods to the market.

The other thing I liked was the fact that most of them squatted and displayed their goods on the ground.  This necessitated me having to take photos from the ground level. And so I had to discretely kneel or squat to get the best angle which, I found,  was not easy to do in a crowded market especially when a live snake is among those on display.

Here’s a further report about that little adventure.

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

She still has several fresh water fish to sell but she still hopes to get them sold out before the end of the day.

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

This lady, on the other hand, looks a bit worried as she still has a pile of tilapia and other fish on her stall.

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

She examines the dried fish she’s selling while her baby examines her face.

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

At the vegetable section, this lady is still re-stocking her display of bush leaves

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

And this one tends to her boy as she keeps watch on her display of wild fiddleheads

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

These ladies appear to have sold most of the vegetables they earlier displayed on banana leaves

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

These onion vendors smiled for the camera as I knelt in front of them to get some shots

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

While these girls were a bit shy to show some teeth

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

At the fruit section, others watched as this vendor tries the fruit she’s selling

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

In this row, the vendors are arranging their goods in neat piles (a weighing scale is not used in this market)

Jessie T. Ponce

He’s just one of the very few male vendors at the market and he stopped arranging the peanuts he’s selling to pose for my camera. Behind him are some of his villagemates, one is selling the bow he’s carrying but doesn’t have an arrow to go with it.

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

This lady sells strands of fiber extracted from some bush plants. The girl behind her is knitting a bag using the same fiber.

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

But indigenous bags are also gradually being replaced by plastic such as these recycled plastic sacks.

Jessie T. Ponce Photography

These colorful yarn bags woven by these ladies are also getting more popular in Kiunga than bags made of indigenous materials. They don’t look very appropriate for the fish though.

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